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Woman seeks divorce as husband stops her from playing PUBG

Man says he feared wife would get addicted to gaming and neglect family duties

A young woman in her 20s has sought divorce from her husband as he would not allow her to play the online game PUBG.

Captain Wafa Khalil Al Hosani, Director of the Social Centre at Ajman Police, told Gulf News that the centre received one of the most bizarre cases among married couples as it was connected with gaming.

Capt Al Hosani said an Arab woman came to the centre seeking help after a dispute over the game with her husband turned violent.

“The woman justified her demand for divorce by saying that she was being deprived of her right to choose her means of entertainment as she derived pleasure and comfort from the game. It was well within limits, she said, adding that she had not activated the chat option where she would be exposed to strangers and was playing the game only with her friends and relatives.”

 

She said the husband feared she would get addicted to the game, which may lead her to be negligent in her duties towards her home and family. The man, however, maintained that his opposition was not a matter of suppression of freedom, but just a step to keep the family together. He told the police officer that he did not expect things would end the way they did, with his wife asking for divorce.

Capt Al Hosani said the centre, which received many couples at odds with each other, tried its best to ensure they resolve their differences.

Meanwhile, the centre has also received complaints of children being addicted to the game. In one case, Capt Al Hosani said, the mother of a 13-year-old boy visited the centre, saying he was addicted to PUBG. “He was not doing his school work nor eating his food properly. When the family tried to block access to the game, he isolated himself and had to be moved to hospital for treatment.”

Capt Al Hosani said these games are extensively played by school students. “They are the most happening place for exchange of ideas among children, a talking point for them and a goal to reach with a competitive spirit. This has led them to isolate themselves from the outside world and their families.”

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